About Us Contact Us Links & Resources Home Site Map
NutritionalVitamins.org
Vitamins Minerals Amino Acids Contact Us Resources Site Map
    

Boron

Calcium

Chromium

Copper

Germanium

Iodine

Iron

Magnesium

Manganese

Molybdenum

Phosphorus

Potassium

Selenium

Silicon

Sodium

Sulfur

Vanadium

Zinc

Germanium- Benefits, Deficiency Symptoms And Food Sources

What is Germanium?

Germanium is not necessary to human health but it has few important in human life however, its presence in the body does stimulate metabolism. Many disease states, such as osteoporosis, heart disease, immune system dysfunction and cancer have all been shown to respond to germanium therapy so it is good for the treatment of important human illness.

Uses and Benefits of Germanium

Germanium improves oxygen flow to tissues of human body, and medical researcher also believed that this alone is a major part of why it is such a dynamic element. Due to it's improved oxygen flow nature to tissues boosts circulation, human body improves stamina and endurance. It has also produced some truly remarkable results in the treatment of cancer.

Although germanium enhances the action of oxygen in your cells, it also acts as an antioxidant. This means that it is able to reduce the extent of the damage caused by toxic by-products of oxygen metabolism that takes place in your body.

Recommended Dosage for Germanium

For germanium, the typical dietary intake for humans is 0.4 to 3.4 mg per day. Many persons will need to start at one capsule per day, and leave off for one or two days when detoxification proceeds if the reaction feels too strong .

Deficiency Symptoms of Germanium

Some common symptoms of a germanium deficiency are asthma, leukemia, breast cancer, lung cancer, bladder cancer, neuralgia, cardiac insufficiency, nephritis, hypertension Neurotic disorders, hepatic cirrhosis, softening of brain tissue.

Rich Food Sources of Germanium

Rich food sources of germanium are garlic, shiitake mushrooms, onions, bran, whole wheat flour, vegetables, seeds, meats, dairy products, aloe vera, comfrey, ginseng and suma . It may also be found in asparagus, pulse, white deepwater fish, garlic, lime beans, mushrooms, sea salt, sesame seeds, soybeans, spinach (see warnings below), summer squash, Swiss chard, and turnip greens.

Cautions and Some Side Effects for Germanium

Because Germanium is considered to be a "heavy metal", it may cause problems in water-based areas, by contaminating the water. Germanium is thought to have a "blood-thinning effect", which may be caused by the increase of phosphorus in the blood stream.

 


VITAMINS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | NUTRITION BLOG | SITE MAP

Disclaimer: The services and information provided at nutritionalvitamins.org is for educational purposes only and not intended to act as an substitute for a professional medical advice. It is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease. Always take proper advice from your doctor before starting any diet, exercise, or other health program at our site. We will not be liable for any complications, or other medical accidents arising from the use of any information on this web site or any of our partner website.