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Molybdenum - Benefits, Deficiency Symptoms And Food Sources

What is Molybdenum?

Molybdenum is much known minerals and it is important to human. Molybdenum is a component of the enzymes xanthine oxidarse, aldehyde oxidase and sulfite oxidase. It is found in several tissues of the human body and is required for the activity of some enzymes that are involved in catabolism, including the catabolism of purines and the sulfur amino acids. Molybdenum is concentrated primarily in the liver, kidney, bone, and skin.

Uses and Benefits of Molybdenum

Like many of the other minerals, molybdenum is necessary to the body's ability to carry out the metabolization of fats, carbohydrates, copper and nitrogen. Like many of the other minerals, molybdenum is necessary to the body's ability to carry out the metabolization of fats, carbohydrates, copper and nitrogen. In human, molybdenum forms oxides and is a component of a pterin coenzyme essential for the activity of xanthine oxidase, sulfite oxidase, and aldehyde oxidase.

Molybdenum is a component of several important interactions that lead to detoxification of the liver. Because of molybdenum's ability to raise the body's pH, molybdenum may be beneficial in the treatment of cancer, viruses and parasites. It also helps to prevent anaemia like iron. It promotes the sense of well-being in humans. It may also protect against stomach and cancers. It aids in the metabolization of fats and carbohydrates.

Recommended Dosage of Molybdenum

The following daily intakes are thought to be plenty for most individuals:

Infants birth to 3 years of age: 15 to 50 (mcg).
Children 4 to 6 years of age: 30 to 75 mcg.
Children 7 to 10 years of age: 50 to 150 mcg.
Adolescents and adults: 75 to 250 mcg.

Deficiency Symptoms of Molybdenum

We are not likely to suffer from Molybdenum deficiency unless our diet is dependent on food grown in areas whose soil is low in Molybdenum. In theory, deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) causes a severe disease in humans that usually results in premature death in early childhood and is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait.

Rich Food Sources of Molybdenum

The amount of molybdenum in plant foods vary significantly and are dependent upon the mineral content of the soil. Beans, dark green leafy vegetables, legumes, peas, beans, cereals, rice, yeast, whole grains, liver, kidney, low-fat milk and hard tap water are all good sources of the molybdenum mineral. The best sources of this mineral are beans, dark green leafy vegetables, and grains. Molybdenum is also found in several tissues of the human body and is involved in several enzyme systems.

 


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